Month: May 2018

What Happens to My “Digital Property” After I Die?

digital assetsProbate in Wisconsin has traditionally dealt with two kinds of property – the physical and the intangible. The latter, intangible, refers to assets like bank accounts or stocks that lack a physical form yet serve as a defined store of value.

These days there is another, distinct type of intangible property that we all possess in one form or another: digital property. This encompasses everything from your email to your iTunes account with thousands of downloaded songs and videos. Up until recently, figuring out what happened with your digital property upon death meant looking at the terms of service for every company with which you do business. In other words, Facebook may say one thing when it comes to whether or not your estate can access your profile post-death, while Google may say something completely different with respect to the fate of your Gmail account.

What Happens if the Trustee of My Trust Fails to Follow My Instructions?

Although trusts are not difficult to create, they do require a certain degree of administration. If you are presently serving as a trustee, particularly of an irrevocable trust, you must take care to faithfully execute the trust instrument’s instructions. If you do need assistance with trust administration, you should not hesitate to contact a qualified Madison probate and trust administration attorney for assistance.

Wisconsin Court Orders Ex-Trustee to Pay Sister $100,000

Recently, a Wisconsin appeals court affirmed an order removing the trustee of an irrevocable trust precisely because he failed to follow the trust’s instructions. The trust was first established over 20 years ago. The person who made the trust, known in legal terms as the settlor, operated a bed and breakfast in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. The trust owned a 30% interest in the limited partnership that actually owned the property.

Should My Child’s Bankruptcy Affect My Own Estate Planning?

One of the biggest estate planning concerns that we hear about from parents is that they are reluctant to leave a potentially sizable inheritance to their financially irresponsible adult children. This raises an interesting question that you probably have not considered in connection with your own estate plan: What happens if my child files for bankruptcy just before I die? Will my estate be forced to pay off my son or daughter’s creditors?

What Happens When an Executor Steals Money from a Wisconsin Estate?

Trust is a critical part of estate planning, and we are not talking about revocable living trusts. We are talking about the fact that you need to entrust another person–i.e. the personal representative or executor of your estate–to manage your affairs after you die. Your choice of an executor is often more critical than deciding how to distribute your property. After all, if you select someone who is untrustworthy, there is no guarantee that your estate will be administered in accordance with your wishes.

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