Month: May 2017

How To Avoid Income Tax on IRA Distributions After You Die

Let’s face it. many people HATE paying tax. And many people hate paying income tax when distributions are made from their IRA.

We recently were working with a gentleman from our area on his estate plan. He owned property in Dane County. He had never been married and he never had children.

He wanted to leave some things and some money to a family member of his, but he liked the idea of setting up some scholarship funds. So, after quite a bit of discussion, he decided to name his college as the beneficiary of part of his IRA when he died. But he did not want the funds from his IRA to go into the general funds of the college. So, we are restricting the IRA so that it can only be used in a certain curriculum of the university. Now, he knows that students in his prior field will benefit from scholarships that he establishes.

He also knows that none of his IRA will go the federal government or the State of Wisconsin (or any other state for that matter). By naming his college as the beneficiary of his IRA, even if the money can be used for certain restricted purposes, the distributions after his death to the college will go income-tax free.

If you are leaving some assets to individuals when you die, and other assets to charities or educational institutions, you may want to consider leaving all or part of your IRA to the charities. Charities don’t pay income tax when they are the beneficiary of an IRA. Leave your non-IRA assets to individuals – there will be no income tax consequence to those individuals.

The estate lawyers of Krause Donovan Estate Law Partners, LLC practice law in the areas of Probate, Wills, Estate Planning, and Trusts. We assist clients in and around Madison, Wisconsin with all matters related to estate planning, trusts, and probate matters. Our dedicated attorneys will even make house calls if you are unable to come to our office.

Contact our office by calling (608) 268-5751 to schedule a consultation or use our online contact form.

What will happen to your online accounts after death?

The internet has turned the paper trail of one’s life into virtual confetti of online accounts. Sure, it’s not hard to find someone’s Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter accounts. You might even be able to guess a password or two. But you won’t guess them all, and even if you could you might be breaking the law; in many places, accounts can’t be legally accessed by anyone other than the holder.

All that gray area creates the potential for Twitter, Facebook, email and other accounts to sit stranded online in a state of suspended animation. At best, they’ll be creepy reminders every time they prompt friends and family to wish a happy birthday to the departed. At worst, they’ll keep important assets, like bank balances, locked away.

There are currently federal and state laws that may make it a criminal offense for anyone other than the account owner to access an account. This is true even if the owner gives another person permission to do so.  By the end of 2017, it is expected that almost every state will have enacted some form of the Revised Uniform Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act. RUFADAA will allow for users to request a digital assetsservice provider to give a fiduciary access either by opting in on an online tool furnished by the service provider or through one’s estate planning documents.

The biggest challenge facing your estate may be finding digital assets after a death. If your family or named fiduciary isn’t aware that you have a Dropbox account, no one may ever look for it.

We recently partnered with Directive Communication Systems which provides personal representatives with a powerful solution for managing personal accounts. When the time comes, DCS works with accounts to implement an estate’s final wishes which may include deletion, transference, memorialization or other instruction. Even a financial institution can be contacted to initiate next steps for the attorney. With DCS, you can be assured that accounts will be managed securely and estate administration will be handled smoothly saving both time and anxiety.  …

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